Diabetes aumento de peso And why it happens

Diabetes aumento de peso.. Insulin and weight gain: Avoid weight gain
Insulin and weight gain often go hand in hand, but it is possible to control weight. If you need insulin treatment, here’s how to minimize – or avoid – gaining weight.

diabetes weight gain

Written by Mayo Clinic staff

Weight gain is a common side effect in people who use insulin, a hormone that regulates the absorption of sugar (glucose) from cells. This can be frustrating because maintaining a healthy weight is an important part of your overall diabetes management plan. The good news is that it is possible to maintain your weight while using insulin.

The relationship between insulin and weight gain

When you inject insulin, glucose can enter the cells, so blood glucose levels decrease. This is the objective that is sought with the treatment.

diabetes weight gain

However, if you eat more calories than you need to maintain a healthy weight (depending on your level of activity), the cells will receive more glucose than they need. The glucose that the cells do not use accumulates in the form of fat.

Avoid gaining weight while taking insulin

Eating healthy foods and being physically active most days of the week can help you prevent unwanted weight gain. The following tips can help you avoid extra pounds:

Calculate the calories. Eating and drinking fewer calories helps you prevent weight gain. Stock the refrigerator and the pantry with fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Plan for each meal to have the right combination of starches, fruits and vegetables, proteins and fats. In general, experts recommend that the dishes consist of half of vegetables without starch, a quarter of protein and a quarter of starch, such as rice or vegetables rich in starch, such as corn or peas (peas, peas).

Reduce portion sizes, avoid serving another plate, and drink water instead of high-calorie beverages. Talk to your doctor, nurse or dietitian about strategies and resources for meal planning.

Do not skip meals. Do not try to reduce calories by skipping meals. When you skip a meal, you are more likely to make bad decisions regarding food at the next meal because you will be very hungry. Skipping meals can also cause low blood sugar if you do not adjust the insulin dose.

Do physical activity Physical activity burns calories. A reasonable goal for most adults, established by the Department of Health and Human Services, is to do at least 150 minutes of moderately intense aerobic activity per week, such as walking, biking, water aerobics, dancing or doing gardening work, in addition to muscle strengthening exercises, at least twice a week. Talk to your doctor about the activities and exercises that are right for you.

Also, ask the doctor how to best manage the exercise. Physical activity helps the body use insulin more efficiently, so, depending on the amount of exercise you plan to do, you may need to reduce your insulin dose or eat a snack. It is possible that the blood sugar level decreases even hours after exercise.

Ask your doctor about other diabetes medications. Some medicines for diabetes that help regulate blood glucose levels -such as metformin (Fortamet, Glucophage, others), exenatide (Byetta), liraglutide (Victoza), albiglutide (Tarzeum), dulaglutide (Trulicity) , sitagliptin (Januvia), saxagliptin (Onglyza), canagliflozin (Invokana), dapagliflozin (Farxiga), empagliflozin (Jardiance) and pramlintide (Symlin) – can promote thinning and allow you to decrease the insulin dose. Ask your doctor if these or other medications would be appropriate as part of your diabetes treatment plan.

Administer insulin only as instructed. Do not skip or decrease insulin doses to avoid weight gain. Although you can lose weight if you take less insulin than prescribed, the risks are serious. Without enough insulin, the blood sugar level will increase, as well as the risk of complications related to diabetes.

Weight and Type 1 Diabetes

If type 1 diabetes is not diagnosed or treated it can cause a loss of weight in the person. With type 1 diabetes, the body stops producing the hormone insulin, needed to use glucose, the main form of blood sugar. Glucose comes from the food we eat and is the main source of energy needed to stimulate the functions of the human body.

Because the body can not use glucose properly it breaks it down (and calories) in the urine. As a result, a child with type 1 diabetes can lose weight, despite having a normal or increased appetite. Once a child or adolescent with type 1 diabetes is diagnosed or treated, their weight usually returns to normal. Being overweight can also occasionally be a problem for people with type 1 diabetes.

Some children with type 1 diabetes gain weight before acquiring the disease. Also some children with type 1 diabetes can gain weight after being diagnosed with the disease if they do not maintain healthy eating habits and exercises. Being overweight is not related to type 1 diabetes, but because large amounts of fat can make it harder for a child’s body to use insulin properly, obese children with type 1 diabetes may also have difficulty controlling levels. of blood sugar.

Weight and Type 2 Diabetes

Many people are overweight when diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Overweight and obesity increase a person’s risk of type 2 diabetes. If a person already has type 2 diabetes and gains weight it will be even more difficult for him or her to control your blood sugar level.

People with type 2 diabetes have a condition called insulin resistance. These people can produce insulin, but their body is not able to transfer glucose into the cells. As a result, the amount of glucose in the blood increases. Then, the pancreas has to produce more insulin to try to overcome that problem.

Eventually, the pancreas may become fatigued by over-functioning and not being able to produce enough insulin to keep blood glucose levels within normal levels.

People with insulin resistance are often obese and do not exercise much. But weight loss, eating foods in healthier portions and exercising can reverse insulin resistance. For people with type 2 diabetes, reversing insulin resistance allows them to reach certain levels of blood sugar more easily, and in some cases, the human body’s ability to control blood sugar can even normalize.

People who do not have diabetes may have insulin resistance, but are at greater risk of acquiring the disease. For those who are obese, but do not have type 2 diabetes, losing weight and exercising can decrease the risk of contracting the disease.