difference between arterial and venous ulcers And their definition

0

difference between arterial and venous ulcers، n this article we will discuss vascular ulcers, showing the differences between arterial and venous ulcers , this type of lesions represents most of the ulcers in the lower limbs being difficult to manage entities associated with advanced stages of the underlying vascular disease, differentiating between one and the other is important for the establishment of the most appropriate treatment.

difference between arterial and venous ulcers

What is an ulcer?

An ulcer is a solution of continuity of our tissues with the outside in the form of a chronic wound that shows loss of substance.

What are vascular ulcers?

Are those ulcers produced by circulatory disorders (arterial, venous, lymphatic or mixed). They are mostly seen in the lower limbs and are characterized by being difficult to manage, corresponding to an advanced stage of the underlying disease.

They are a public health problem with socio-economic repercussions (cost of treatment, absenteeism), sanitary (resources necessary for their care), which affect the quality of life of the patient and even its psychological sphere (feeling of rejection, emotional tension).

The most frequent are the venous ones (70-90%), followed by the arterial ones that are seen in smaller proportion. It should be noted that, in both cases, although for different reasons, hypoxia plays an important role in its production mechanism and in both cases the healing process is difficult

Differences between arteries and veins ulcers:
From mobile devices slide the table horizontally with your finger

Venous Ulcers Arterial ulcers
Aetiopathogenic pillar: They are due to venous hypertension Aetiopathogenic pillar: They are due to reduced arterial blood supply
There are three possible causes: Muscle pump failure, valvular reflux and venous return obstruction, or a combination of them. Causes: They may be due to arteriosclerotic obstruction or embolism of the arterial vessels. Hypertensive disorders due to arterial hypertension (Martorell ulcers) and the angiotensin (Buerger’s disease) are also described.

Location: They are more frequent towards the inner side of the lower third of the calf. Location: In areas of bony prominences. Hypertensive ones are more frequent in the anterior and external area of ​​the lower third of the calf. The atherosclerotic arteries are more frequent towards the malleolus and interdigital areas.

Not very painful They are usually very painful
When they are associated with pain this usually improves with the elevation of the extremity Pain improves when you lower your foot and stay seated
They tend to be of torpid evolution They can evolve quickly
They usually produce an exudate in moderate or high amount, they bleed easily. They produce little or no exudate (unless infected), bleed little
Regarding their appearance: they show irregular margins, their depth is usually low and they have a bed reddened with remains of yellowish fibrinous tissue. Regarding their appearance: they show marked margins of flat edges, they tend to gain in depth and can even reach tendons or bone, have a pale bed (gray or yellowish) with little granulation tissue and even areas of necrosis.

Skin around the ulcer: it usually shows hyperpigmentation, hardening and peeling, findings of lipodermatosclerosis, eczema, white atrophy. Skin around the ulcer: thin, pale or somewhat red, may not have hair.
In the case of thrombosis, livedo reticularis (mottled reddish) can occasionally be observed

It’s more common in women It is more frequent in men
Pulses present although by edema or thickening of the skin can be difficult to palpate. Pulses not palpable or almost imperceptible
Extremity temperature is normal The limb can show coldness
They represent 70-90% of vascular ulcers They represent 5-10% of vascular ulcers.

Venous Ulcers Arterial ulcers

Aetiopathogenic pillar: They are due to venous hypertension Aetiopathogenic pillar: They are due to reduced arterial blood supply
There are three possible causes: Muscle pump failure, valvular reflux and venous return obstruction, or a combination of them. Causes: They may be due to arteriosclerotic obstruction or embolism of the arterial vessels. Hypertensive disorders due to arterial hypertension (Martorell ulcers) and the angiotensin (Buerger’s disease) are also described.

Location: They are more frequent towards the inner side of the lower third of the calf. Location: In areas of bony prominences. Hypertensive ones are more frequent in the anterior and external area of ​​the lower third of the calf. The atherosclerotic arteries are more frequent towards the malleolus and interdigital areas.

Not very painful They are usually very painful
When they are associated with pain this usually improves with the elevation of the extremity Pain improves when you lower your foot and stay seated
They tend to be of torpid evolution They can evolve quickly
They usually produce an exudate in moderate or high amount, they bleed easily. They produce little or no exudate (unless infected), bleed little

Regarding their appearance: they show irregular margins, their depth is usually low and they have a bed reddened with remains of yellowish fibrinous tissue. Regarding their appearance: they show marked margins of flat edges, they tend to gain in depth and can even reach tendons or bone, have a pale bed (gray or yellowish) with little granulation tissue and even areas of necrosis.

Skin around the ulcer: it usually shows hyperpigmentation, hardening and peeling, findings of lipodermatosclerosis, eczema, white atrophy. Skin around the ulcer: thin, pale or somewhat red, may not have hair.
In the case of thrombosis, livedo reticularis (mottled reddish) can occasionally be observed

It’s more common in women It is more frequent in men
Pulses present although by edema or thickening of the skin can be difficult to palpate. Pulses not palpable or almost imperceptible
Extremity temperature is normal The limb can show coldness
They represent 70-90% of vascular ulcers They represent 5-10% of vascular ulcers.

Leave A Reply